Sunday, 15 February 2009

Lucinda


The February issue of Three Crow Press went live today. I've got a story in it. Lucinda. In the interest of full disclosure (am I using that phrase correctly?) I should tell you that this is not a crime story. It's a work of speculative fiction and it features in the, um, erotica issue of the webzine. Two sex stories in one month. Thank God my ma doesn't read this blog.

I may have to think about expanding my themes...

I've been quiet for over a week now, but for good reason. Writing and family stuff. There'll be more on the writing stuff some time next week. The family stuff, I'll keep to myself. this blog's meant to be about crime fiction, after all.

Luckily, while I've been posting nothing, Declan Burke's been as busy as ever. His latest Indo article reviews four upcoming crime fiction novels. Three of them are written by writers from the North. Go see what he has to say.

11 comments:

seanag said...

You know it's not us you need to worry about--it's your wife.

I have a little trepidation after that ThugLit one. Nevertheless, here I go...

Gerard Brennan said...

Seana - In the interest of full disclosure (again, somebody tell me if I'm using this right) I asked my wife to read both of these tales so they wouldn't come back and bite me in the ass some time in the future. After reading Hard Rock she called me a sick bastard. I couldn't think of a comeback. She said she liked Lucinda, though.

Again, thanks for taking the time.

gb

marco said...

I thought the "family stuff" was your wife throwing things at you after reading Hard Rock, but apparently that's not the case.
You're lucky your kid is still in the 0-3 years range, meaning it is not likely he will remember the ordeal you put him through and develop parricidal feelings in later years.

In the interest of full disclosure (again, somebody tell me if I'm using this right)

The phrase is generally used when you reveal something -about you or your work-that may have an influence on the reception of your argument.
So in the first case it is perhaps more right than in the second.
But you'd better ask, I don't know, an Oxford-educated lawyer.

Gerard Brennan said...

Marco - Nah, the missus is well used to my... foibles, now. She's quite a non-violent person too, thank goodness. I've earned more than a few flying saucers.

RE the lingo lesson -- Cheers for that. I wonder where you'd find an Oxford Educated Lawyer? Even a "failed" one would do in a pinch...

gb

seanag said...

It strikes me that what's most interesting to me in these two--very different--tales are the female characters. They seem related in some way. Although they come to different ends, which is ultimately what makes one a crime story and the other not, in both cases the women have preferences and dictate the terms. True, sometimes the terms we dictate don't always go to plan, but that's life.

Wise move, showing your wife these stories up front. I hope she regards herself as a civilizing force.

Michael Stone said...

You should have called this a Rinky Dinky Kinky Linky post, mate. You missed a trick there.

Gerard Brennan said...

Seana - I think you might be on to something there. I'm sure there's some deep-seeded psychological reason for this, but I'd prefer not to open that can of worms.

Mike - Ah, man! What a missed opportunity. I'm ragin' with myself.

gb

seanag said...

Oh, I'm not urging you to get all self-analytical on us. I just think you write intriguing, uh, 'quirky' female characters, which is a strength you might want to keep exploring.

Gerard Brennan said...

Seana - That's good to hear. My current novel-in-progress is written entirely in my female protagonist's POV. Let's hope I can make it work on a large scale.

gb

Stuart Neville said...

Good stuff yet again, Gerard. You're on quite a roll at the minute.

Gerard Brennan said...

Stuart - Thanks, yet again. Yeah, it seems like I'm on the receiving end of some extra-sweet karma. Long may it last!

Cheers

gb